Welcome to the Network Security website at the IAS

This website is intended to bring you the latest news, how to's, tools and resources in Information Security.  Security Awareness of our Faculty, Members and Staff is key in creating a safer computing environment.

The three major Principles of Information Security, Availability, Integrity and Confidentiality, will be covered throughout the security awareness program at the Institute.  For a description of these principles, please see our About section.

In keeping with the spirit of the Institute, I encourage questions and open discussions about security.  And if you discover anything out of the ordinary, please feel free to bring it to my attention so that we can work together to create a more productive, safer environment.

Thanks,
Brian Epstein <security@ias.edu>


2014 CyberSecurity Awareness Month wrap-up

Although November is here, let's not forget the many lessons we learned this year from CyberSecurity Awareness Month (CSAM).  The majority of issues I spoke about related to technologies that are dead, or should be dying in the 2014 Tech Obituaries section of my talk.  Here are the highlights of what technology died (or should have) over the last year.

LG Smart TVs logging USB filenames and viewing info to LG servers

This is a story right out of the privacy tome of nightmares.  It reminds me of a recent talk by Mikko Hyppönen where he states that "George Orwell was an optimist" (Living in a surveillance state).

A blogger by the name of DoctorBeet posted a story of his LG Smart TV taking note of his watching habits and attempting to send them over the Internet for targeted ads or other nefarious reasons.  What's worse, is it was sending information about the USB stick that he put into the TV.

Does unsubscribing from spam make things better or worse?

It has been a common thread in security talks since the inception of spam that it is a bad idea to give any type of response indicating that a human is reading the spam.  For example, by clicking on the "unsubscribe" link in a spam, all you are doing is asking to be put on more lists.

This interesting article by Laura Atkins from Word to the Wise (an anti-spam consultancy and software firm), debunks this setiment, and calls it a myth.

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